Reviews - Updated on July 5, 2022

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Competitor of our series history?

Alex Aniel is a Resident Evil fan, and the idea to write a book about the beloved franchise came to him while strolling through the GDC conference with Capcom staff. These people told a lot of interesting things about the series – it seemed that only one grateful listener who spoke Japanese was required for a good chronicle. And Aniel went to interview – the foundation for the book was his conversations with Shinji Mikami (Shinji Mikami), Hideki Kamiya (Hideki Kamiya) and other key people for the franchise.

Translated editions often get new covers drawn because the rights to the originals are sold separately from the books and are often unnecessarily expensive as well.  Which one do you like best?

Translated editions often get new covers drawn because the rights to the originals are sold separately from the books and are often unnecessarily expensive as well. Which one do you like best?

Why the original name “Itches.  Delicious

Why the original name “Itches. Delicious” turned into “Resident Evil of the gaming industry” – a question for the publisher. The answer, however, is easy to predict: they thought that it would sell better this way.

Curse of the Cash Cow

Resident Evil is popular, and people who write about it face two serious problems. First, the history of the series is well researched; to unearth at least one curious and unknown fact about it is a non-trivial task, not to mention filling an entire book with such information. Secondly, after the success of the original parts, Capcom began to rivet cheesy, penny spin-offs, so after the story of the cult trilogy from the first PlayStation, the researcher of the series will inevitably have to mention Outbreak, Gaiden, Dead Aim and other mediocrities that would have sunk into oblivion long ago, if not for the words Resident Evil on the covers. It is unlikely that someone will want to scroll through chapters about licensed parts, but would you be interested in reading an entire chapter about unsuccessful attempts to port the first Resident Evil to the Game Boy Color? ..

Gaiden is not the scariest game in the world, but is it possible in principle to create horror for a portable device from the nineties?

Gaiden is not the scariest game in the world, but is it possible in principle to create horror for a portable device from the nineties?

True, there is not very much information about the “poor relatives” of the cult parts of the series in the book, because, in principle, not very much is known of it – not only because almost no one cares about them, but also due to the fact that Capcom deliberately hides information about its outsourcers. Of course, even so, the story of some Survivor can turn out to be interesting, especially if it is presented well – but, alas, Aniel has problems with this.

The book is rather stingy with information about the developers: a brief formal biography, sometimes a photo, that's all.  In the story about Kamiya, for example, his Twitter account is covered in the most detail.

The book is rather stingy with information about the developers: a brief formal biography, sometimes a photo, that’s all. In the story about Kamiya, for example, his Twitter account is covered in the most detail.

The author, according to him, is a fan of the series – all the more surprising is the dry and neutral tone he chose, which is more suitable for encyclopedias, and a similar structure of chapters: information about the authors and development – setting and plot plot – descriptions of mechanics – reviews in the press – the number of copies sold. The apotheosis of this approach is a bonus chapter added specifically for the Russian edition and looking as if it was written without looking up from Wikipedia. Materials from the vaunted exclusive interviews, which the author boasts of in the preface, sometimes come across, but they are so few that they drown in a stream of banality.

Sometimes the author hits on the retelling of key scenes of games - this is pointless, because fans already remember them, and who needs textual descriptions if you can start the game (or at worst open YouTube) and experience all these moments yourself?

Sometimes the author hits on the retelling of key scenes of games – this is pointless, because fans already remember them, and who needs textual descriptions if you can start the game (or at worst open YouTube) and experience all these moments yourself?

But the story about the legendary voice acting of the first part, for example, is excellent: it turns out that the problems that Denis Karamyshev complained about in Lost in Translation are typical not only for localizations, but also for some originals:

Lynn Harris provided the voice of Rebecca and was also in charge of casting other characters. Harris says that her work was extremely hacky, as she was not given even basic information about the game during the recording. She notes that the process was generally incoherent. “No one informed me about what scene was happening. I had to work with what I had. Decisions about how and where to use the voices and in what context were made by the developers, who, I realized, did not understand English well, if at all.

It is these “funny incidents on the set” that are the main value: tales of how Noboru Sugimura (Noboru Sugimura), writer of Resident Evil 2, brought pornographic literature to Kamiya’s ward, Hiroki Katō, head of development at Code: Veronica, was writing the script for Wesker’s Report drunk, and Barry Gjerde, in strict accordance with the approved text, read out famously stupid phrases like “You almost turned into a Jill sandwich.” Alas, such “living” stories in the book can be counted on the fingers – and besides them, it almost entirely consists of well-known facts and primitive analytics.

 Literature, unfortunately, is not the best medium for a story about voice acting: the translators themselves (!) Attached links to especially outstanding examples, which, apparently, the owners of paper copies are invited to retype into the browser on their own.

Literature, unfortunately, is not the best medium for a story about voice acting: the translators themselves (!) Attached links to especially outstanding examples, which, apparently, the owners of paper copies are invited to retype into the browser on their own.

If you know very little about Resident Evil, then Aniel’s work will be useful to you as a compendium of the most basic information – but for the same purposes, you can also watch our History of the Series, which also has a serious advantage: the video sequence. Fans of the franchise, however, run the risk of not getting much from either of these sources; the book also ends at the fourth part, leaving out everything that came out after it. A sequel, however, is already being written – perhaps things will be different with him.

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